Kathmandu-Pokhara-Chitwan-Lumbini Nepal

Overview

The history of Kathmandu is really a history of the Newar people, the main inhabitants of the Kathmandu Valley. While the documented history of the valley goes back to the Kiratis, around the 7th century BC, the foundation of Kathmandu itself dates from the 12th century AD, during the time of the Malla dynasty.

The original settlements, in what is the southern half of the old town, grew up around the trade route to Tibet and in early pilgrim resthouses such as the Kasthamandap, which later lent its name to the city.

Originally known as Kantipur, the city flourished during the Malla era, and the bulk of its superb temples, buildings, and other monuments date from this time. Initially, Kathmandu was an independent city within the valley, but in the 14th century, the valley was united under the rule of the Malla king of Bhaktapur. The 15th century saw division once more, this time into the three independent kingdoms of Kathmandu, Patan, and Bhaktapur. The rivalry between the three city-states led to a series of wars that left each state weakened and vulnerable to the 1768 invasion of the valley by Prithvi Narayan Shah.

The ensuing Shah dynasty unified Nepal and made the expanded city of Kathmandu its new capital – a position the city has held ever since.

Pokhara is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Nepal. Many tourists visit Pokhara Valley to see the Himalayan range and lakes. Pokhara is also famous for boating, trekking, rafting and extreme sports like rafting, canoeing, and bungee

The Chitwan National Park (CNP) is a world heritage property, and it also contains a Ramsar Site – Beeshazari Tal in its buffer zone. The CNP has a history of over 3 decades in park management and rich experience in resolving conflicts between the park and the people.

It is a rich natural area in the Terai, the subtropical southern part of Nepal. A total of 68 species of mammals, 544 species of birds, 56 species of herpetofauna and 126 species of fish have been recorded in the park. The park is especially renowned for its protection of One Horned Rhinoceros, Royal Bengal Tiger and Gharial Crocodile.

LUMBINI: BIRTHPLACE OF BUDDHA

Lumbini is the place where the newly born Prince Siddharta (known as Buddha) took his first seven steps and uttered an epoch-making message to the suffering humanity. This happened in a beautiful sal grove, which is now the focal point of the Lumbini Garden area. Maya Devi, the queen of Shakya King Suddhodhana of Kapilvastu, while passing through the Lumbini Garden. on the day of “Vaisakha Poornima’ (Full Moon Day of May 623 B.C.) took a bath in the Pushkarini (the Sacred Pond) and soon after she took the support of a tree branch, then gave birth to the Crown Prince Siddhartha, who became Buddha. The Lumbini Garen covers an area of 1 *3 sq. miles (2.56sq.km) and encompasses three zones each covering one square mile connected with walkways and a canal. The area has a subtropical monsoon climate with a warm wet season.

Detail Itinenary